Idol by Kristen Callihan

So is it just me or does anyone feel like this series is criminally under-rated? Kristen Callihan is someone I stumbled across by accident and now I’ll read anything she puts out. Idol is the first in her V.I.P. series (a classic inter-connected yet stand-alone romance series) and boy does she start it off with a bang.

We’ve got a couple of tropes I love in this one. Number one, it’s obviously a rockstar romance. A bit of a twist here is that she’s also musical (though not a musician), and there are some VERY cute scenes where they sing/write music together. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

So we start off by meeting the main character, who has one of the coolest heroine names I’ve ever come across: Liberty Bell. Maybe you didn’t read that right. Liberty. Bell. That’s so bold Kristen and I love it. Anyway she goes by Libby and she is quite the self-sufficient, independent, slightly gruff little firecracker. Libby meets Killian, clearly the love interest, when he crashes his motorcycle into her yard about two pages into the book.

I don’t know about you but there are a couple things I love in a good romcom book. One, no long, boring, unnecessary intro. Two, no stupid love triangle that leaves me angry and unable to invest in anyone. Three, a hot, dark-haired, mysterious man on a motorcycle. So there we go folks. Kristen is delivering on all three for me and all I can say is thank you.

Killian is great. He’s charming, funny, hot, interesting, and actual has depth to his character. I loved him and Libby together. It starts as one of those classic “the girl doesn’t know who the famous guy is, thus making the famous guy feel like she likes him for him” tropes but then gets way more interesting and dynamic. It was a quick, exciting, satisfying read.

Steam rating: Hot but not the main point of the story.

Anything You Can Do – R.S. Grey

If you have not yet picked up this series and you’re a fan of hilarious realistic fiction romance, let me just say wow. I envy the experience you’re about to have diving into these beauties. There are more than a dozen of these already published and Grey pops out at least one if not two more every year. They’re all stand-alone which is super convenient but a couple do have overlapping characters which can be fun for loyal readers who have been keeping up with Grey since the beginning. I recommend these wholeheartedly, and there’s such a wide selection of tropes (CEO, rockstar, royalty, cowboy… you get the picture) that you’re sure to find a leading duo up your alley.

Anything You Can Do is by far one of my favorites out of this entire series, which is saying a lot. This has so many great tropes rolled into one I don’t even know where to begin. The book follows Daisy, a brilliant and genuinely funny doctor who returns to her hometown to work (and hopefully take over) the local practice. Little does she know, Lucas, her childhood friend-turned-rival, is back home for the same reason.

The moment when they see each other after 11 year apart… BOOM!! Your heart. Your mind. Your entire body. Just boom. The chemistry is literally explosive. I have never wanted two fictional characters to hook up so badly. Not to mention the BANTER. It is so incredibly good and so incredibly not-cringe it’s astounding. No one quite does the bant like Ms. Grey but she has outdone even herself with this one.

The story moves incredibly quickly in a good way. I read this 277 page beauty in one sitting and something tells me you will too. It’s that good and Lucas is that hot.

I’m always a sucker for enemies-to-lovers but throw in that they’ve known each other since childhood, they’re both doctors, the steam level is high but definitely avoids pornographic, and not once did the heroine make me want to kill myself?? Gold. Do yourself a favor and pick this one up.

Steam Rating: Hot but still cute.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.